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Wednesday, August 5, 2020 | History

2 edition of Zoonoses as occupational diseases in agriculture & animal related industries found in the catalog.

Zoonoses as occupational diseases in agriculture & animal related industries

James H. Steele

Zoonoses as occupational diseases in agriculture & animal related industries

by James H. Steele

  • 84 Want to read
  • 22 Currently reading

Published by American Medical Association in Chicago .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Agricultural laborers -- Diseases.,
  • Zoonoses.

  • Edition Notes

    Bibliography: p. 26-30.

    StatementJames H. Steele.
    ContributionsAmerican Medical Association.
    The Physical Object
    Pagination30 p. ;
    Number of Pages30
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL14177906M

    Programs for the control of diseases communicable from animals to man, called zoonoses, especially those in pets and in wildlife, are closely related to human health. Further, the diseases of animals are of increasing importance, for a primary public-health problem throughout the world is animal-protein deficiency in the diet of humans. Zoonotic diseases are infectious diseases that can pass from animals to humans. Seventy-five per cent of new human diseases are zoonotic. Some zoonotic diseases, such as Hydatids, Anthrax, Hendra virus infection, Avian influenza or Rabies can be very serious in humans and may cause fatalities.

      Zoonoses - animal diseases that can affect humans Diseases passed from animals to humans are known as zoonoses (pronounced zoo-oh-no-sees). They can be caused by viruses, bacteria, parasites and fungi.   Veterinary medicine and animal care workers are at risk of exposure to zoonoses, infectious diseases that spread from animals to humans. Possible routes of transmission include aerosol, droplet spray, ingestion (oral), direct contact, indirect contact (e.g., fomite), or vector-borne. Sources of exposure include animals, body fluids, contaminated tools, surfaces, or other objects in the.

    Unfortunately, this book can't be printed from the OpenBook. If you need to print pages from this book, we recommend downloading it as a PDF. Visit to get more information about this book, to buy it in print, or to download it as a free PDF. zoonosis (zō-ŏn′ə-sĭs) n. pl. zoonoses (-sēz′) A disease of animals, such as rabies or psittacosis, that can be transmitted to humans. [New Latin: zoo- + -nosis, alteration (influenced by -osis) of Greek nosos, disease.] zo′onot′ic (-ə-nŏt′ĭk) adj. zoonosis (zəʊˈɒnəsɪs; ˌzəʊəˈnəʊsɪs) n, pl -ses (-siːz.


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Zoonoses as occupational diseases in agriculture & animal related industries by James H. Steele Download PDF EPUB FB2

Additional Physical Format: Online version: Steele, James H. Zoonoses as occupational diseases in agriculture and animal related industries. Chicago: American Medical Association, © Zoonoses are discussed as occupational diseases, with special reference to animal husbandry and related activities. After quoting some historical references, occupational zoonoses are examined in.

These diseases are called zoonoses. People are exposed to the bacteria, protozoa, fungi, viruses and parasites that cause zoonoses in a number of ways and therefore anyone working with or handling animals needs to know about zoonoses and the precautions they must take to.

Introduction. The population employed in agriculture in Poland is about 25% of total employment [].Occupational diseases of farmers are to a large extent caused by biological factors [].Biological hazards are micro-organisms and macro-organisms, toxins and allergenic substances produced by them that have harmful effects on human health [].

Cited by: 6. Zoonoses are a persistent threat to the global human health Today, more than diseases occurring in humans and animals are known to be mutually transmitted.

Classical infectious diseases, such as rabies, plague, and yellow fever, have not been eradicated despite major efforts. New zoonotic diseases are on the increase due global conditions such as overpopulation, wars, and food scarcity Cited by: The present status of the zoonoses as occupational diseases in agriculture and related industries is reviewed.

The main topics reviewed are: bacterial diseases, including anthrax, brucellosis, glanders, tetanus, tularemia, bovine tuberculosis; parasitic diseases; rickettsial diseases; and viral diseases, such as psittacosis, ornithosis and influenza.

There are many disease agents that can cause disease in multiple species of animals including humans. These diseases are called zoonoses.

People are exposed to the bacteria, protozoa, fungi, viruses and parasites that cause zoonoses in a number of ways and therefore anyone working with or handling animals needs to know about zoonoses and the precautions they must take to minimise their risk of.

[Zoonoses as occupational diseases]. [Article in Russian] Nafeev AA, Salina GV, Nikishin VA. The article represents materials on risk for animal husbandry workers of being infected with Coxiella and Leptospira. The authors describe contemporary difficulties in diagnosis Author: Nafeev Aa, Salina Gv, Nikishin Va.

A zoonosis (plural zoonoses, or zoonotic diseases) is an infectious disease caused by a pathogen (an infectious agent, such as a bacterium, virus, parasite or prion) that has jumped from an animal (usually a vertebrate) to a human. Typically, the first infected human transmits the infectious agent to at least one other human, who, in turn, infects others.

How to cite this article: Chethan Kumar HB, Lokesha KM, Madhavaprasad CB, Shilpa VT, Karabasanavar NS and Kumar A () Occupational zoonoses in zoo and wildlife veterinarians in India, Vet World 6(9):doi: /vetworld Introduction exposes them to numerous health-related risks in their Zoos and National Parks have long been day to day activities.

laud their book as an ideal reference for veterinarians, veterinary techni-cians, and professional students, and as a general resource for healthcare professionals to help them understand and manage zoonotic diseases.

Infor-mation on common, and currently top-ical, zoonoses are included; the book addresses diseases caused by bacteria. The STEPS Centre has a range of research projects and resources which explore zoonoses (diseases that can be transmitted from animals to humans), offering new theory as well as practical solutions.

Our work often considers the landscape of politics, policy processes and international responses to pandemics and resources cover diseases including avian influenza, swine influenza, Ebola, Lassa. These diseases are known as zoonoses, and if you work with animals your health may be at risk from them.

Although some of these diseases (eg anthrax, brucellosis and rabies) are not common in Great Britain, good occupational hygiene practices will protect against them, as well as other more common zoonoses such as leptospirosis, orf or Size: 65KB.

This incredibly timely book provides, for the first time, practical guidelines for "One Health" collaborations in a wide range of clinical human-animal health issues, including the H1N1 virus, zoonotic diseases, the human-animal bond, animal allergy, bites and stings, and animals as /5(6).

This multivolume handbook presents the most authoritative and comprehensive reference work on major zoonoses of the world. The Handbook of Zoonoses covers most diseases communicable to humans, as well as those diseases common to both animals and humans.

It identifies animal diseases that are host specific and reviews the effects of various human diseases on animals. Zoonosis is another name for a zoonotic disease. This type of disease passes from an animal or insect to a human. Some don’t make the animal sick but will sicken a human.

Zoonotic diseases range. Animal bites are a serious public health problem, with an estimatedU.S. emergency room visits for a dog bite-related injury in Dogs are responsible for approximately 80% of all bites, cats accounting for less than 20% and other pet species and wildlife responsible for the remainder.

Merck and the Merck Veterinary Manual. Merck & Co., Inc., Kenilworth, NJ, USA is a global healthcare leader working to help the world be well. From developing new therapies that treat and prevent disease to helping people in need, we are committed to improving health and well-being around the world.

Ian Lipkin, in Mandell, Douglas, and Bennett's Principles and Practice of Infectious Diseases (Eighth Edition), Zoonoses, derived from the Greek words for animal, zoo, and the suffix modification indicating a state or condition, sis, are infectious diseases of humans that originate in animals.

Infectious diseases that originate in humans and move into other animals are commonly. *Zoonoses In California, of animal diseases reportable to the California Department of Food and Agriculture (table 2) over 40% are zoonoses.

Some zoonotic diseases on the two lists of reportable diseases over lap. Examples of such diseases include: anthrax, brucellosis, encephalomyelitis, erysipelas, listeriosis, rabies, and tuberculosis.

The human–animal–environmental interface that is relevant for addressing the burden of foodborne parasites requires a one-health approach. One-health interconnects zoonoses with agriculture and food safety and has enhanced the response by authorities to reorganize and respond to the majority of parasitic zoonoses (Bidaisee and Macpherson.Occupational zoonoses in animal husbandry and related activities Article Literature Review (PDF Available) in Annali dell'Istituto superiore di sanita 42(4) February with Reads.The motivations for zoonoses control programmes and for their commencement and/or extension are discussed, with reference to their role as indicators of the social and economic status of a country.

KEYWORDS: Communicable diseases - Occupational health - Public health - Veterinary public health - Zoonoses - Zoonoses control. INTRODUCTION.